Transcript  list for the video The Incredible Experience vs Ice Age - part 2 by Rolf Witzsche - Ice Age Ahead (iaa)

Transcript list by scene for the video: 
The Incredible Experience vs Ice Age - part 2

 

 

- 1 - Two major types of stars have been discovered
- 2 - The low surface-temperature category
- 3 - The closest red dwarf in the stellar neighbourhood
- 4 - The red dwarf is surrounded by a cloud of atomic elements
- 5 - Of the category M type, at 4,000 degrees Kelvin
- 6 - The sunlight spectrum would be shifted to a lower profile
- 7 - The small size of the world population
- 8 - It is possible for seven billion people to live
- 9 - That the red-dwarf stars are inactive stars
- 10 - Stars are classed by luminance into 6 categories
- 11 - These lesser, still active stars, like our Sun
- 12 - Mainstream cosmology has no basis for recognizing inactive stars
- 13 - Our Sun would be a thousand times heavier
- 14 - The star UY Scuti, that is 1700-times larger
- 15 - Mainstream cosmology champions impossible paradoxes
- 16 - Force the stars in a galaxy to align themselves
- 17 - All the stars are deemed to be orbiting the galactic center
- 18 - The famous Hertzsprung-Russel Star-Data diagram
- 19 - Of the active stars, the star Sirius
- 20 - The star Fomalhaut
- 21 - Sirius is twice as large as the Sun
- 22 - The star Spica-A
- 23 - The progression breaks down
- 24 - The star, Arcturus is 25 times larger
- 25 - Alderbaran is 44 times larger in size than the Sun
- 26 - The progression in surface temperature by size is broken
- 27 - For the Sun, the high-density plasma compression
- 28 - For the stars Arcturus and Alderbaran
- 29 - It evidently takes a lot of plasma
- 30 - Plasma density may vary regionally across the galaxy
- 31 - The low surface temperature of Arcturus and Alderbaran
- 32 - Rigel is nearly 80-times larger than the Sun
- 33 - Blue stragglers
- 34 - The giant active star, Rigel, is of the B class
- 35 - Two examples of class-O stars
- 36 - The O-class star that has created the nebula
- 37 - Inactive stars in the range of 3,000 to 4,000 degrees
- 38 - The main star of the Antares system, Antares A
- 39 - Antares-A is 300 million kilometers in diameter
- 40 - The star Betelgeuse is of the same category
- 41 - An example for a star burning by nuclear fission
- 42 - When our own Sun goes inactive
- 43 - The Earth will not loose its Sun
- 44 - The hyper-giant star, UY Scuti
- 45 - The star Rigel may be at the border line
- 46 - When our Sun goes inactive
- 47 - Plasma-density in our galaxy has diminished
- 48 - Two-thirds along Antarctica froze up
- 49 - We will see the photosphere simply go dimmer
- 50 - Photograph of a very-small red-dwarf star
- 51 - A tangled network of a vast array of plasma streams
- 52 - When a star looses its connection
- 53 - The white-dwarf star stage
- 54 - The principle of orbiting stars
- 55 - The reason is inherent in plasma physics
- 56 - High-mass brown-dwarf star WISE1828
- 57 - Inherently low mass-density in atomic structures
- 58 - An atom is a dynamic structure
- 59 - An atom is 100,000 times larger than its parts
- 60 - When the electron density in the plasma is high
- 61 - A tiny star orbiting a large star
- 62 - Any size of star can be formed with plasma concentrations
- 63 - In plasma cosmology no miracle is required
- 64 - Surface area functions as a catalyst for interstellar plasma
- 65 - The principle also applies to our own star, the Sun
- 66 - The Sun's plasma shell is dense enough
- 67 - The resulting low-level default value
- 68 - Very large stars have lower default values
- 69 - It is enough for us to know that evidence tells
- 70 - What the Dansgaard Oeschger oscillations indicate
- 71 - Evidence supports the inactive stage

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Published by Cygni Communications Ltd. North Vancouver, BC, Canada - (C) in public domain - producer Rolf A. F. Witzsche