Ice Age Ahead (iaa) - Free educational videos  by Rolf A. F. Witzsche

Ice Age  Precursors
Part 3 of 6 

 

 

 

 Cosmic Dynamics - Electrodynamics

 

Four major climate cycles affect the Earth: the 11-year solar cycles; the 100,00-year Ice Age cycles; the long cycle of 62 million years in duration, and the very long 145 million year cycles. None of them are mechanistic in nature. All have an electro-dynamic underlying cause, which furnishes the only rational explanation of these cycles, which until recently has only been understood in terms of scientific mysticism.

 

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Part 1

The Ice Age Climate is the normal climate for the Earth. Our warm period is the anomaly.

Part 2

Are the Ice Age Cycles mechanistic or dynamic? What about global warming?

Part 3

Of the four major climate cycles - the 11-year solar cycles, the 100,00-year Ice Age cycles, the long 62 and 145 million year cycles - are any of them mechanistic in nature?

Part 4

Food production is already deeply affected by our climate that is gradually getting colder. How will we respond when  70% of the world's agriculture becomes simultaneously rapidly disabled?

Part 5

While nobody cares to acknowledge the Ice Age challenge, it has ruled the political scene already for 35 years, and deeply, where it has been acknowledged in a decisive manner.

Part 6

Most people are unaware what forces in the physical universe impact their living in the form of floods, drought, tornadoes, hurricanes, rain, or just plain cold weather, which affects them right down to the prices on the grocery shelf. Nor are they aware of the options that exist to avoid the resulting tragedies. 


Rolf Witzsche
researcher, author, producer, and publisher

My published books, research, novels, science, free online,

 

Published by Cygni Communications Ltd. North Vancouver, BC, Canada - (C) in public domain - producer Rolf A. F. Witzsche

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